Sofie’s Picks: My Top 4 Fashion Only YouTube Channels

Fashion used to be very prevalent on YouTube. In high school, I was obsessed with Back To School lookbooks. However, trends have changed since then, and the rise of the Beauty Community has overshadowed any need for these kinds of videos. Closet essentials are a thing of the past. For those of you who are still in need of some classic fashion inspiration (myself included), here are my top four fashion channels: (The best part? They all have different forms of content for subscribers with different needs)

By Sofia Greaves

Best dressed (Ashley)

Let’s start this off with a fellow (recently graduated) college student. The concepts of her videos are pretty general and helpful for those who are interested in making their daily outfits a little more elevated for everyday occasions such as: class, dates, and lunch with friends, just to name a few. Plus, she emphasizes the importance of thrifting and sustainability. My favorite videos by her are “How to build an outfit”, “50 OUTFITS for when you have nothing to wear”, and “10 WAYS TO (re)WEAR A DRESS.

https://incertainlight.com/

In Certain light- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhW4LGKKTDc

ICL is a London Based street style channel that was made to promote the physical blog https://incertainlight.com. Videography is done by Joanna Theodorou and she has been regularly filming the unique high end street style from all the major European fashion weeks since 2014, as well as covering the off duty styles of notable models. You get a sense of what is going to be trendy and what will trickle down to mass market just from seeing major influential people like Eva Chen [seen above in red], Alexa Chung, and Romee Strijd in these videos.

Frugal Aesthetic-

While mainly targeting men, this entertaining channel by Christian Vui does cater to anyone who is even remotely into creative streetwear. He makes his content easy to follow with pictures being shown as he discusses certain topics with voice-overs. On this channel you will find an abundance of How-To’s: How to find your style, learn ways to wear a hoodie, and how to style white sneakers are a few of his. Guy or girl, his channel is a good start for learning how to organize your personal style with basics and clothing you definitely already have.

TheLineUp-

The incredible videography in all of their lookbooks makes them feel like ad campaigns. The videos alone are just aesthetically pleasing. There isn’t a lot of commentary, but it’s the music along with video that inspires you to put on your fiercest outfit. Getting ready for work, school, or a day or night out has never been easier since they cover all of these occasions. Julia Dang is a mastermind of street style. Recently, she has been mixing high-end accessories with thrifted/easily accessible pieces, giving access to a wide range of people and their budgets. Back when Maya was apart of the channel, together they made outfits that use trendy pieces in a way where a 2016 back to school lookbook could be worn today and not feel dated. They also know how to have fun with their style, and their summer lookbook captures the essence of the season.

No matter how vastly different these channels are, they all have one thing in common: they commit to their confidence. They used basic necessities as a platform, and trend pieces as a bold statement. What makes them unique are in the details, and if you check out their videos you will see how each of them make their own rules and use getting dress as a reason to leave the house a do something great. They are determined to make A Bigger Boom, just like Nuview is this month

A BIGGER BOOM!

Being bold isn’t a cry for attention, people staring at you isn’t always a bad thing, following all the latest fashion trends doesn’t make you a sheep, or unoriginal, but ignoring what’s trendy doesn’t make you a rebel. Lastly, confidence can be fake at first because eventually, with time, it won’t be. This month, let’s be loud and obnoxious, let’s be “extra” in the best way possible!

Here at Nu View, our goal is always to impress and inform our readers. This month, we will be doing that with the utmost tenacity. The articles featured this month will be about YouTube channels that are strictly fashion, statement pieces, swimwear that’s making a splash, a study on Versace, and all the latest patterns and fashion fabrics. This month, boredom has created a new mindset, new concepts are funded by free time, “extra” is a state of mind, and the innovators lead fashion.

Do you remember that quote by Coco Chanel, “before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off,” well, this month, put 5 things on. If you don’t think something matches, but you love it, wear it anyway, take chances.  This month started with fireworks and a celebration of freedom, let’s keep that going. With July comes the freedom to think creatively, try new things, ignore restraint, discover what you like through trial because there is no error, and next month will be your metamorphosis. “Extra” is a synonym for confidence, and this month we show you 50 shades of “extra”. Last month started and ended with a bang, but July will be A Bigger Boom!

     

-Don and Sofia

Billie Eilish, The ONLY Thing She Want You To See Her In Other Than A Crown.

by Sofia Greaves

“Judge. Me. Please”

When I first heard of Billie Eilish, I heard her music before seeing what she physically looked like. After seeing how she composes herself through her oversized streetwear, I thought she was a rapper. The lyrics to most of her new songs are as subversive as her style (cannibal class, killing the son; bury a friend, I wanna end me). Some people love it and some people do not. I happen to love it.

I was never concerned with why she chose to dress herself a certain way, I just knew she was making a big statement. “Judge. Me. Please” was her answer when asked to describe her style in three words, in her 2017 Vanity Fair interview

As she is blowing up, people are experimenting with their style by imitating hers. In fashion, red carpet, and Youtube review shows she is constantly mentioned and referenced As an artist, people expect your style to be on trend or trend setting. Billie decided to follow the street wear trend of over-sized and or monochromatic. The amazing thing about Billie’s style is that she looks so comfortable and attainable. Most of the clothes she is seen in is a more embellished and expensive version of what I wear to 9 am classes in the North Texas winter.

As a fan, I should have made the connection between her reasons for dressing baggy and her music (her first E.P. is literally called Don’t Smile at Me), but as a fashion enthusiast it seemed more about personal choice than a social or political statement. There is an intentional “anti-femininity” agenda in her clothing. She says verbatim “that’s why I wear big baggy clothes, nobody can have an opinion because they can’t see what’s underneath”. The reason we are enthralled by her is because she is completely in control of how we perceive her. The style she expresses not only shows no size limit, but also has no specific gender preference. . Billie is not the first female celebrity to take away attention from her body, but she has done it in such a unique way that I felt to emphasize and spotlight her fashion choices.

Thrift Shopping for Dummies: A 6 Tip Crash-Course on All Things Thrifting

By Don Davis

Remember when buying clothes from a thrift store was considered embarrassing… yeah, me neither! The biggest trend for a few years now has been thrifting. Long gone are the days when people are embarrassed and won’t admit to buying clothes from thrift stores. In fact, it’s just the opposite, you are considered the ultimate fashionista if someone asks you where you bought something and you say thrift store or flea market. Let’s face it we’re all broke, but thanks to thrift stores nobody knows that. So, here is my guide to being a baddie on a budget: thrift store edition, may the thrift shop odds be ever in your favor.

Tip #1

Don’t just go whenever! Select thrift stores have college nights where EVERYTHING in the store will be a certain percentage off, sometimes it’s as much as 50% off. Most thrift stores also keep a calendar specifying all their sales for the month, more importantly when they restock, make sure to grab one. I always say if it’s not in your phone it doesn’t exist, so add the really big sales like “all winter apparel 99 cents” (yes, that actually happened) in your phone so you don’t forget them. It’s also important to stay connected, some thrift stores have an email list you can sign up for, and social media accounts you can follow for even more deals, discounts, and inspiration.

Tip #2

Thrift shopping is not just an activity, it’s an event, make sure you have the whole day cleared, odds are you’ll need it. Also, make sure you don’t leave the house without the following: your student ID, dressing for the occasion, a Tide stain stick to see what stains can be removed or at the very least faded, and best friends. Thrift shopping can be long and tedious but going with your friends will make it a fun and crazy adventure. You could be a second pair of eyes for each other and pick out things you think the others would like, and have little competitions to see who found something brand name, or even better, designer, or who got the most clothes for the least amount of money. Also, most thrift stores offer student discounts. The one good thing that college has done for us is giving us student ID’s with no expiration date. Always take your student ID with you, (no matter how bad your picture looks) you’d be surprised how many other stores offer student discounts. Lastly, dress for the occasion, when going thrift shopping you should be dressed one of two ways: either in comfortable clothes or wearing something that goes with/matches what you are looking for, because not all thrift stores have dressing rooms.

Tip #3

Location, location, location! If you need help finding some thrift stores go to The Thrift Shopper.com for a list of thrift shops in your area. Although, the best thrift shops are always located downtown. That’s usually where you’ll be able to find all the brand name and vintage designer stuff. That’s another reason why I suggested bringing friends, can you say mini road-trip!

Tip #4

In speaking of designer, you know the best place to find name-brand items like Thrasher, Adidas, Harley Davidson, Nike, and my personal favorite – Tommy Hilfiger? THE BOYS SECTION! When going thrift shopping leave no stone unturned and section unsearched, the men’s section has tons of hidden gems, and the clothes in the men’s section also tend to be cheaper too. The last time I went shopping I found an oversized vintage yellow Tommy Jeans sweatshirt in the men’s section for less than four dollars. By the way, for all my designer brand snobs, don’t forget about online shops like Etsy and Poshmark.

Tip #5

People usually make one of two common thrifting mistakes: either they are a little too ambitious and overestimate their DIY and sewing skills, or they buy clothes they don’t really like just for the sake of buying something and because it’s cheap. Don’t be afraid to walk out the store empty-handed because “if you don’t absolutely love it in the store [then] you won’t wear it” (Sandra Bullock as Leanne Tewey in The Blind Side). Next thing you know, you’ll have a closet full of clothes you can’t even remember buying and wonder why in hell you bought them in the first place. Also, and this should go without saying, but don’t buy things with broken zippers, missing buttons, holes, or rips that you plan on “fixing later”, because you won’t. And don’t buy things that need to be tailored, or need a ton of alterations done to them, especially, if you are barely able to cut a t-shirt into a crop top.  

Tip #6

Lastly, and by far the most important, wash everything you just bought as soon as you get home. I could tell you horror stories about what people have told me happen to the clothes in thrift stores and flea markets, so store your bags in the trunk of your car till you get home, then wash them immediately.

Bonus: Tip #7

Little tip, the first Saturday of the month Goodwill has a 50% off sale, AND it lasts all day, but try to get there when they open, so you get first-dibs on all the good stuff.  Goodwill also gives you 20% off your purchase if you bring in clothes to donate.

Blast From The Past

Adele Witt and Taylor Hemby

Fashion goes in cycles- whats old today is new and in style tomorrow. Every season we see the runways fluctuate with element that are both new and some that are familiar. The past few years we have seen boho explode, everything from ditsy floras and blousy tops. There is no denying the 70’s are back. We had the pleasure of going to Texas Fashion Collection and got to see the looks that are hot now in their original form from the 70’s. Annette Becker, director of the Texas Fashion Collective, showed us some truly amazing pieces.

Ms. Becker pulled out 1970’s garments that showcased classic trends from the 1970’s.  She showed us everything from hand stitched patchwork, ethnic-inspired prints, full sleeves, and ‘Little House on the Prairie’ inspired gingham prints. There were also a few pieces, such as the classic Chanel suit that were made new with design elements such as brighter colors and braided trim. One hostess ensemble by Hanae Mori (below) uses Japanese Motifs and vivid colors of green, pink and yellow. All of these pieces contain typical 70’s elements that are now coming back into current fashion trends.

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Maxi dresses, popularized by the hippie movement are now a favorite of today’s bohemian girls and are especially popular in the summer and spring. For example, Andrew Zimmerman, an Australian designer, updated maxi dresses of the decade with fresh white, full peasant sleeves, organic lines and mini pearls. Another version, was a turquoise blue halter with feminine ruffles and dark blue paisley designs on the bodice and hem. Gunne Sax, a huge brand from the 1970s is widely credited with being the original hippie maxi dress (below).

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Ethnic motifs, prints and silhouettes, popularized by internationally known designers such as Yves Saint Laurent in the 1970’s are also trending for the upcoming warmer season. Saint Laurent also popularized loose flowing blouses in the 70s (see below) and those to are coming back. On the spring 2019 Runway, Chloe used traditional Persian motifs in handkerchief skirts blouses and jumpsuits, giving culturally distinctive prints modern-day high fashion appeal.

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Patchwork was original a way of covering up holes and tears in clothes, it was very popular in the 20th centuy before mass production when clothes were more expensive.  It was also a form a og hand needlework mainly practiced by women. Today patchwork is fashion forward and is used in jeans, dresses, skirts and other types of apparel for both men and women. For spring 2019 designers such as Sacai, Coach and Isabel Marant used patchwork in new ways. Marant substituted the spring colors of pink, white and baby blue, while Coach paired denim patches with a brown cowboy-esque fabric on the shoulders. On the street, many young women have taken the style further. Instead of using mainly denim for their patchwork fashion, they are wearing items made from animal print, solid colors, or wool fabric patches.

 

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The 1970’s was an era of freedom and expression, especially in fashion. Previous trends that were seen before as belonging to folk dress, the hippie movement and lower classes became popular among high fashion circles. Today, these trends have resurfaced and become popular along millennial trendsetters from all races, genders, and classes. As a result many popular fashion brands and retailers have embraced this market niche. Classic fashion eras of the past are making a comeback, and who knows which era will inspire the next season?

 

Resources:

Creative Spotlight: Hunter Harwick

“My brains is a Jumble of Many Ideas.”

On a cloudy spring day, we met Hunter Harwick in his his two bedroom apartment. He was wearing a black t-shirt and white pants. His apartment was very reflective of himself. Harwick is a 20 year-old up and coming photographer in the DFW and Austin areas. He’s a sophomore in the Studio Art program with a concentration in Photography here at the University of North Texas. Kenzie and I were able to sit down with Hunter and ask him a few questions about his work. He sat on the edge of his bed as his dog Ringo and his cat Casper were laying by him on his bed.

Screen Shot 2019-04-03 at 5.47.05 PM.png  “Stay Gold, Ponyboy” December 2018

Bennett: Where do you get your inspiration?

Hunter: “I get a lot of it from environments I’m in. Like my room, I spend a lot of time there. I want to make sure that all of my environments are inspirational and creatively stimulating. I look at Pinterest a lot and scrolls for hours, tries new things with my photography.”

His room was a fresh, simplistic place with mid-century modern furniture, plants and pets.

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Hunter in his room with his dog Ringo and cat Casper

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Hunter’s room

Kenzie: Describe your art style.

H: “I would say like my photography fits into one style because I’m interested in so many things. I have concept-heavy work for class, it’s a different look from his fashion portraits from Instagram. I work from different angles and focuses for Instagram and play with color.I’ve tried to stick to a style, especially for my insta, but I found that it limited me. It’s easy to get caught up in the insta aesthetics but I found that when it comes to my photography that like doesn’t work for me, because I’m interested in many things.”

“I love like “weird” photography…”

Screen Shot 2019-04-03 at 5.47.59 PM.png “tunnel vision” February 2018

 

B: What are you interested in?

H: “I’m not interested in the normal. I love like “weird” photography like doing something that isn’t like typical or considered the norm for fashion photography. When it comes to conceptually driven work, I’m currently working on a project about our connection to the environment and how we’ve become disconnected from the earth and we should become reconnected. So I’m out shooting myself, self portraits, as I’m interacting with the earth to make a statement and get stripped down to the most vulnerable state. I can show you these if you want.”

Harwick pulled out this phone and shows me images from the upcoming project. The photos were of himself in nude self portraits interacting with the earth. Each photo was captivating in its own way, and shows personal and intimate moments by himself.

“Omg, I think it’s a big thing that most of my conceptually driven work has been self portraits. No one can better portray what’s in my brain than me. For me, it’s more efficient because I don’t have to direct anyone or like I don’t really have to convey my image to a model because it can be difficult to explain.”

Screen Shot 2019-04-03 at 5.47.37 PM.png “Lele” October 2018

“I thought they were so good at the time but looking back they are so cringy.”

 

K: How long have you been into photography and how did you get into it?

H: “I got this super super cheat point and shoot camera for Christmas in sixth grade and it was literally like $30 at Kohl’s, it was the shittiest thing ever, but at the time I thought it was so cool. And so I slowly upgraded camera wise until 8th grade when I got my first DSLR and I would say that is when I started taking photography seriously. I would shoot with friends for fun. I thought they were so good at the time but looking back they are so cringy.”

He pulled out his phone and showed me his old Instagram account showing his old photographs.

“They’re literally so bad, I don’t know what I was thinking with these angels.”

 

B: What has been your favorite project?

H: “The one I’m working on right now is called “Reconnect” tentatively lol. It’s self portraits of me reconnecting with the earth. I feel like it’s the most meaningful project because its current. I feel like a lot of people can relate and it makes them ask themselves what can they do to reduce their footprint.”

K: One last question, what does the future hold for you?

H: “Ideally I’d like to move to New York or LA after I graduate and get an internship to be able to stay there, you know what I mean? I want to stay there and find a place and get a job doing anything creative. I don’t want to limit myself but my dream would be to freelance and do my own thing.”

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Hunter and his dog Ringo in his apartment.

You can follow Hunter on Instagram @hunterharwickphoto or visit his website www.hunterharwick.com/

Written by Bennett Brown and Kenzie Hirsch

Hunter photographed by Bennett Brown

Images supplied by Hunter Harwick at @hunterharwickphoto on Instagram

Alice’s Very Important Date

A vintage fashion show goes “Down the Rabbit Hole”

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On April 24th, 2017, what was once just the UNT Union Ballroom was transformed into a whimsical fairy-tale fashion world thanks to the hard work of the talented Merch Inc. fashion show production team, who created a fabulous Spring show titled “Down the Rabbit Hole.”  Unlike Merch Inc. fashion shows in the past, this show has a unique story element  inspired by Alice in Wonderland, using vintage styled looks from Circa 77, a local vintage shop in downtown Denton.

After a long day backstage filled with freshly painted props, endless garment racks, and more eyeshadow palettes than you can imagine, the show finally came together. By the time I took my seat in the ballroom, the anticipation was high, and what was in store for the audience did not disappoint.

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The show began with two figures emerging from the audience, who soon became clear were models representing Alice, from the classic Lewis Carroll novel, and Hamish, her not-so-eligible bachelor. After a dramatic proposal scene on stage, the show began in full force. Model after model emerged in carefully styled and uniquely vintage ensembles, each portraying a fashionable interpretation of classic Alice in Wonderland characters, such as the Cheshire Cat, Tweedle-Dee, and The Mad Hatter. The models each walked in character, sauntering past magical mushrooms and roses throughout the runway.

The rest of the show paid homage to the classic Alice in Wonderland“Tea Party,” the iconic “White Queen” and “Red Queen” scenes. Each section of the show had its own feel and attitude, which complemented the outfits being modeled perfectly. The tea party looks were a combination of preppy and retro, whereas the white queen looks were celestial and angelic, giving the models an appearance of floating on air. Finally, the show came to an end with the finale of the Red Queen, which included a series of fierce and fiery red and black looks.

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The attendees of the Spring Merch Inc. show were transported to another world, myself included. The students, volunteers, and staff who worked tirelessly to put the show together delivered something truly unforgettable and special. As Lewis Carroll wrote in Alice in Wonderland, “Imagination is the only weapon in the war against reality.” “Down the Rabbit Hole” was a wonderful escape from reality, and an impressive showcase of the imagination and creativity UNT’s merchandising students possess.

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Show Production by the Merchandising Inc Fashion Show Committee

Words by Reiily Farris

Photography by Criselda Ocon and Michaela Bull

Edit by Maia Wilson

Click the slideshow to see into the show!

An Alice in Wonderland Debut

Going “Down the Rabbit Hole”

Every year, Merchandising Inc. (the fashion organization that is over NuView Magazine) hosts a fashion show on what promotes the zeitgeist of fashion from a collegiate perspective. Every year is different from the next because of the producers’ vision and style captured on campus. This year symbolizes a twisted time for our nation reflected in the desire for a fantasy world. Enter “Down the Rabbit Hole,” an all-student-run fashion show inspired by the combined 2001 and 2010 movie versions of Alice in Wonderland.

The show will take place on Monday, April 24th at 7pm in the UNT union ballroom room 314. Tickets are sold at the door for $5 cash or card. We wouldn’t want you to miss it, but in case you’re several miles away (due to the fact that this is a global site) check back in a week to get the full coverage of both behind the scenes and close-ups during the show. Explore the imagery below to keep you captivated until the day of show!

 

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Words by Maia Wilson

Videography by Lauren McMichaels

Photography by Michaela Bull

Styling by Raeleigh Hall

Modeling by Melissa Caskey

Hair by Carolina Gonzalez

Makeup by Taylar Gomez

Graphic Design by Philip Galuban

Mask by Rose Kuo

Self-made, Successful, and Humble: A Rare Breed

A DFW-based wardrobe stylist and fashion show producer shares his story of how he once turned a new dream into a career all own his own and ended up at the top.

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Willie Johnson is a creative and down-to-earth dreamer who has cultivated himself over the years into becoming one of DFW’s most respected and well-known wardrobe stylists and fashion show producers.

Did you know that you wanted to be a fashion producer and stylist growing up? How did you end up being in the position that you are in today?

No. I didn’t start off wanting to be a fashion producer. I actually used to model and the way I kind of fell behind the scenes is that I use to work for the Kenneth Cole store at North Park and a lady, who still to this day is very essential and important in my life, Lisa Perry, had called the store and asked to speak to me because I had once picked out some shoes for her and gave her wardrobe options. She had asked if I would like to help work a fashion show backstage. At the time, I had never done anything like that before, so I told her yes. So back in 1998, I was twenty three years-old and got bit by the passion that night of the first fashion show I worked at. Literally, as I was backstage I said to myself “this is what I want to do, this is where I want to go”. So that’s kind of how I started, both working in retail and my first show.

Continuing off of that question, after realizing that was what you wanted to do with your life, what career path and stepping stones did you take to get you to where you are today?

It wasn’t easy, I’ll admit it. It was kind of tough. After that first show, I knew what I wanted to do and I dove into it. I stayed at Kenneth Cole because it was a job and I had to market myself. I started trying to connect with professionals, trying to be a part of shows and volunteering myself at events. I began teaching models how to walk and agencies eventually started contacting me to work with their talent. At one point, I ended up working for the same agency that had represented me back when I was younger, but behind-the-scenes. I started learning how to make myself a business by doing things like being on time, making sure I brought clothes back within 24-48 hours, making sure I connected with the right photographers, etc. Truly after a while, I didn’t have to work as much because people started referring me. I started to get referral after referral and that just is how I grew.

After you had established yourself in this industry, what would you say differentiates you from other leaders in the DFW fashion industry?

I started with a “no nonsense policy” and was known to be aggressive and firm. I was friendly, but people knew to bring their A-game when working with me. I also have a mission statement which is “honesty and integrity”. I wanted to be that person that didn’t have the reputation as someone trying to get over on you by “selling a dream”. You’ll get people that will tell you what you want to hear, which is really sad because what you want to hear might not be the truth. I like to tell the truth.

Take us through a day in the life of a Willie Johnson. 

I wake up early, before everybody else gets up. I meditate, pray, and read certain scriptures for encouragement. Then, I sit down to mentally plan my day and write a list of everything I need to get done. I try to get a workout in. From there, I just hit the ground running whether it’s a meeting, or if I have to do a fitting, a runway class, a personal styling consult or anything that my positions requires me to do.

What would you say was a major turning point in your career?

I produced, styled, and co-produced one of the biggest hair and fashion shows in Dallas, The Ascension, which was hosted by Vivica A. Fox about 10 years ago now. That was a really big turning point because I was over a lot of things and it really just made me love what I do. I would say also when I was asked to be the talent director for Pin Show, which is a showcase for independent designers that is one of the largest indie shows in the state and happens every year in February.

What do you wish you would have known back when you were at this age that you had to find out the hard way?

I would highly suggest that every person does internships. I didn’t intern with anyone. I actually had to create my own way and learn the business. An internship teaches you people skills and how to have a good work ethic, especially in this business because a lot of people look at social media and then when they get into this business they realize it’s not what they’ve seen on social media. Social media is fine, but I tell everybody, it goes beyond your Instagram self; you have to be able to talk to people, you have to be able to articulate, you have to have thick skin. Especially being from the South, you can’t go to New York with a Dallas mentality and expect people to smile at you and move slow. You have to move fast.

I see that you’re heavily involved in various philanthropic causes. Could you share which causes inspire you the most and what kind of events you participate in to help these causes?

Well, I support all causes, but the main two that I am very big on are AIDS-related and children’s charities. I just did this event I got back from a few days ago called the “The Fashion Event” in Bryan, Texas where we produced 19 runway shows in 3 days. This event benefited the Mercy Project, which is an organization that helps children who have been kidnapped and sold into slavery in Ghana. So far they’ve rescued 80 children and reunited them back with their parents; that is something that I really care about.

For someone who wants to be in producer/stylist, what do you think is the most important qualities to have?

They have to have people skills, customer service and be a good sales person because you have to convince people to let you borrow their clothes. You have to have patience because you’re dealing with so many people that all have different egos, so you’re normally the calm in the storm. You need to learn how to step outside of yourself and realize that it’s not about you, it’s about the event.

Has there been anyone in your life that has either really inspired you or has been there alongside you while you developed in your career?

Yes, I actually have five people in my life that have been instrumental in my career development. They are Isacc Birdlong, who “planted the seed” for me. When I used to model at a young age, I would do the local fashion shows with him, so I learned a lot from watching him. Lisa and Reggie Perry really opened the door for me after that. Also, Keith and Denise Manoy. Back in 2006, I was in a bad situation where I had lost most of what I had owned and they helped me get back on my feet and get myself started. I give all of those people credit.

 

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Who would you say has been one of your most influential mentors throughout your career?

Lisa is really the person who started my career of a show producer because she had given me my first start. She planted the seed of being a fashion show producer in me. She really cultivated my career period in everything I did. She cultivated the business side, how to present myself, how to talk to people, everything.

How were you introduced to her?

It was crazy really. Everyone in Dallas knew who Lisa was. She owned 45 Degree Angle, which was an amazing upscale salon that was featured in every major publication across the country. She used to have these beautiful elaborate fashions shows and when I was eighteen I was sitting in the audience and told my friend, “I’m going to work with this lady some day”. Then, five years later she walks into Kenneth Cole. No one introduced me to her, it just happened. I think of it as a “divine connection”. When I went to that first fashion show she had asked me to work at, and five years later God knew it was time for me to meet her.

Getting to know Willie Johnson and listening to his story has been both a pleasure and enlightening. He is a man full of great advice and insight into an industry that he approaches with a different mindset than most other professionals. I believe that because of his deeply embedded passion for what he does and his commitment to always exemplify integrity and honesty with everything he does, truly sets him apart. His authenticity and words of wisdom that he has shared about this industry, his career path and life in general are precious pieces of advice that I know can be of great guidance in some way to any reader.

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“I always tell people that I work hard to make it look easy”.

Special thanks to Willie Johnson for allowing NuView to interview him. Follow him on Instagram @williejohnson3 to see his show adventures.

 

Words by Jacqui Simses

Edit by Maia Wilson and Reilly Farris

Images courtesy of Willie Johnson

April

Impossible Possibilities

“Sometimes I believe in as many as six impossible things before breakfast” -Alice

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Wow it’s April, seriously wasn’t it just New Year’s last week?! I find it interesting how time transcends not only when we’re having the most fun, but also when we are so busy we don’t have time to watch the clock. It seems as though in this era (dare I say the word millennial), we have gotten so invested in making a living for ourselves that all we seem to do is brainstorm new ways we can work. We may work a lot and be so immersed in the future of our career, but it all comes from passion. Our passion is what pushes us to take new steps, small or large into the unknown in order to reach our destination.

In this Month’s issue, the final one of the year I hate to say, we fixate on reaching what may have seemed incapable, but has now been achieved. We look to people a little more mature than us to unravel how they have become the fascinating individual they are now. Some defied the industry by breaking through in a form of media that was recently emerging, some stuck to what they know best and continued on in their destined path, and others found their truest passion where others doubted them and strived their way to the top of their field. Each person we have come in contact with this month we expose them to you, so that you might find them as delightfully inspiring as we do.

As Merchandising Inc’s annual fashion show is right around the corner on April 24th, the show’s title, Down The Rabbit Hole conveys a meaning of twists and turns to reach a bottom where some might think is rock bottom, but to one individual, and multiple who share the same the same mindset is rather a place of wonder. The show is inspired by the obvious Alice in Wonderland film, most recently debuted in 2010 and the sequel in late 2016. In both movies, Alice is informed that it is possible to believe impossible things “sometimes [she] believed in as many as six impossible things before breakfast (quoted from the 2010 Alice in Wonderland movie).” As we cover the show from preview to behind the scenes to final product, we too will believe that things that are deemed too difficult of a task or impractical of a position are ones we need to believe in and devote to. The articles that will be presented on the site this month will prove that sometimes (and quite often) the impossible is rightfully so, possible.

I would like to end by saying it has been a challenging reward to compose these stories we have shared on NuView this year. Every individual who was involved in this process, from the subjects we interviewed to the artists’ work we utilized- every one has made NuView that much more a place for our readers to go for inspiration, uncovered knowledge, and sometimes the hard, honest truth. I am very proud of the work that each member of the magazine has put in this year and quite honestly, amazed by their creativity and humbleness. They are the beings who’ve replaced a daunting, yet exciting project into an accomplished one- which reminds us to not quit on the impossible.

Enjoy the last issue,

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Words by Maia Wilson

Illustration by Kristen Barnhart

Discover her work at kristenbarnhart.com, buy her work at Etsy.com/shop/kbillustration, and follow her on instagram @kb.illustrations