An Alice in Wonderland Debut

Going “Down the Rabbit Hole”

Every year, Merchandising Inc. (the fashion organization that is over NuView Magazine) hosts a fashion show on what promotes the zeitgeist of fashion from a collegiate perspective. Every year is different from the next because of the producers’ vision and style captured on campus. This year symbolizes a twisted time for our nation reflected in the desire for a fantasy world. Enter “Down the Rabbit Hole,” an all-student-run fashion show inspired by the combined 2001 and 2010 movie versions of Alice in Wonderland.

The show will take place on Monday, April 24th at 7pm in the UNT union ballroom room 314. Tickets are sold at the door for $5 cash or card. We wouldn’t want you to miss it, but in case you’re several miles away (due to the fact that this is a global site) check back in a week to get the full coverage of both behind the scenes and close-ups during the show. Explore the imagery below to keep you captivated until the day of show!

 

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Words by Maia Wilson

Videography by Lauren McMichaels

Photography by Michaela Bull

Styling by Raeleigh Hall

Modeling by Melissa Caskey

Hair by Carolina Gonzalez

Makeup by Taylar Gomez

Graphic Design by Philip Galuban

Mask by Rose Kuo

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What the Other Person Thinks

An Insight on Gender Perception

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There is a well-known saying, women don’t dress for men because if they did they would be naked; women dress for other women, referred to by designer, Betsey Johnson. This is a controversial truth, but there is questioning about who people dress for and more importantly how others perceive it. Often, individuals, who have passion for their freedom to exercise their personal style are outcasted by this stray of normality. On the inside they may have that “I-don’t-care-what-people think” mindset, they wear what they want because it makes them happy, but what about the ones who aren’t as confident and maybe care more about what people think of their exterior armour. What do people think about both of these separate dressers? Do people really notice? We wanted cold, hard opinions and what better than from the gracious, but honest guys on our college campus. We would explore the inner thoughts of others by asking what they really think of the outfits that make individuals feel happiest in, but are unique to their counterparts.

I spoke with Marcel Smith, Colton Johnson, Derek Boone, Nate Proffitt, and John Davis-Lopez to answer some of these burning thoughts, and to my surprise their answers were often unanimous, giving us consistent insight into the brains of ones we may not have ever gotten the answers to. I started with the simple question of what do they notice in a person they find attractive from afar.

The first observation was noticeable effort, John stated “I find it attractive when you can tell that effort is put into their appearance” and Nate complemented “and they’re not timid to express their personality in their appearance.” Then posture, “what many people overlook I feel, is posture. People look happier, more friendly and overall more attractive with good posture” Colton commented.

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What is your instinct thought when a someone is wearing a bold piece of clothing?

Nate started with “I think in general I have a lot of respect for people who think outside of the box with their outfits because they don’t necessarily follow a pattern for what is typical or popular.” Similarly, Colton followed with “It takes courage to wear something that will stand out in a crowd. You are wanting to draw attention to your outfit and therefore yourself which is hard for many people these days to do (not behind a screen).” John contradicted though, he explained  I will find it more intimidating to talk to [a girl]. I’m already not bold in general, so by her wearing something bold (well, it’s more in how they carry themselves) I’m going to think that I have no chance.  Marcel also affirmed it’s in “the way she wears her clothes that say a lot about her.”

In general, what draws you to a person?

“Their personality, how open they are to meeting new people, if I can be myself around them without being judged,” noted Derek. Colton seconded, “ to have a personality to back up your outfit is important.” Nate expanded by saying “confidence and people who are positive because it is clear that they are comfortable in their own skin and have a healthy outlook on life.”

Do you think there is a stigma on people who wear outfits that are seen as crazy or unconventional? Why do you think that is?

They all agreed that “a stigma is there, and people are judged for being different.” John added, “People like things the way they are. Seeing something bold will affect what they see as normal.” “There is even a greater problem in male fashion, Colton stated, “where ‘dressing up’ has fundamentally meant the same thing for a 100 years. I was talking to my girlfriend about how depressing it is that we spend countless hours looking for a wedding dress, but when the big day comes [the male is] expected to throw on essentially the same black tux that [his] father did and his father’s father did. “ Nate also commented that “it has gotten a little better, but it used to be that men who took time in their appearance, in clothing and/or hair were labeled gay. “I still see this many cases,” Colton replied.

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It is often perceived that when someone wears an outfit that is viewed as flashy and “out there” in their everyday lives, they really putting on a costume, trying to be a specific character. Do you feel this is true with females?

Colton explained that he doesn’t “believe that putting on a flashy outfit means that they are putting on a character. If anything changes, it is their confidence level which can influence their personality, though that does not change them as a person.” Correspondingly, Derek stated “they might just be a more confident version of themselves.” Nate profoundly commented “I don’t think wearing something different means that you are trying to be someone different it’s just expression in a way that others may have not seen before.”

What do you admire and notice most when approaching a girl? And would you say this is similar in what you see in your guy friends?

Remarkably, most of them mentioned shoes. “Specifically, I pay attention to shoes. Shoes are a big thing for guys” Nate initiated. Colton then stated, they are “the hardest part of the outfit to get right. Picking the right shoe is an art.” Marcel added “I look at that their smile and their shoes.” Then it was about being comfortable in their own skin, John stated, “I admire when someone I  approach can be completely themselves. I admire when they’re not afraid of what other people think,” “This applies for both my male and female friends,” Derek concluded.

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Lastly, do you believe females dress for men, themselves, or other women? Or is it a combination?

“I think that if you ask any girl this question most likely the answer will be for herself.  I believe that is true to some extent, but behind the scenes there is more to the story,” Colton noted. And elaborated, “Our perception of beauty comes from others, so while you are looking cute for yourself, your concept of “cute” came from someone else. In some ways, you are dressing for other women. Now we can go even deeper and figure out what these women were thinking when they made these opinions. Was the look for sex appeal? Nine times out of ten this is the point of fashion. It’s why sells fashion. You could then make the argument that most women dress for men.” For Derek, he feels “different people dress for different reasons. Some people dress for themselves, less confident people might dress to impress others, and those who want a boyfriend might dress to impress a guy they’re talking to.” Marcel related, “I think that it depends on the situation, but for the most part they dress for themselves first and others second.” John summed it up by saying it’s “a combination of the three.”

From asking all of these questions, what struck me was the commonality between their answers. It wasn’t that one had an extreme view from the next, but that they all were aware and impacted by the same features and beliefs, aside from their various backgrounds. Clothes are quite frankly our exterior code of armour, for more reasons than physical safety, but they also can be an instant glimpse of an individual’s personality. What a person wears can define who they are, especially when they do it with confidence and are truly happy in their sartorial selections, and based on the guys’ answers, people notice.

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Special thanks to the five guys who were interviewed. Follow Colton on Instagram @superlativesound, Marcel @marsmith7, Derek @derekthabombb, Nate @nateproffitt63, and John @blackjuan94.

Words by Maia Wilson

Edit by Carolina Gonzalez

Photographs by Blaise Butera

Follow models, Schuyler Hardy @skycornelius and Ximena Arista @xvmena

This is NOT a Thrifted Haul

Styling your Thrifted Treasures

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As college students, we are all trying to spend less money on clothes we buy because let’s face it, we are a cliche of “broke college kids.” The problem though is not looking like we shopped in the discounted section at GoodWill. The editors at NuView accepted the challenge of looking much more elevated than our wallets allow by styling our thrifted finds to create unique looks that can easily be mimicked. Scroll below to discover new ways to style outfits without looking cheap!

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Follow our models, Megan McHugh and Gianna Schneider on Instagram  @meganashleymchugh and @lightofgigi

Styled by Rose Kuo, Taylar Gomez, Maia Wilson, Michaela Bull, Carolina Gonzalez, and Reilly Farris

Photographed by Michaela Bull

Words by Maia Wilson

Shoot Coordinated by Carolina Gonzalez

Why I Dress Up for Class

A personal essay and the facts behind wearing what fits your personality

Upon reading the title of this article I know I am receiving a massive eyeroll from just about every college student out there… but hear me out you guys, I swear, I do have a point.



I will admit, most days I wake up thinking I should just walk out my front door in my pajamas without even glancing in the mirror; but I know that if I do this, I will never truly “leave my bed.” I will just be stuck in this grumpy and tired mentality all day and won’t accomplish as much as I’d like. So here are a few reasons as to why I get ready for class each morning:

1. You just feel more confident. Personally, I have never been one to have my life completely together and running smoothly, so at least by getting ready for school I can fool people into thinking that I do. It’s a given that most college students are struggling to some degree (pun intended) to make ends meet, but that doesn’t mean that we want the whole world to be able to notice “the struggle” when they glance our way.

2. When you find a job and have to wear full-on business attire and be ready at 7 A.M. every morning it won’t seem so bad, because you will already be accustomed to getting up early and looking put-together. It is also a great time to see what types of  looks you like and how you can make them your own before you officially enter the workforce.



3. You always want to dress to impress or to attract the kind of people you want in your life. Even if you don’t want to fess up, most humans formulate impressions about others’ characters seconds after meeting them. It’s just the way humans are wired. The way you dress and present yourself really communicates who you are as a person, so you always want to leave them thinking highly of you!

4. Lastly, when you’re in a fashion-related major, the pressure is ON. Not always from just other classmates within the major itself, either. When I am meeting someone for the first time (on or off campus) and I tell them what my major is, they will literally glance me over and make a snap judgement as to whether or not I know what I am doing by how I am dressed. So, it seems I have to always be on top of my game and ready to prove myself at a moment’s notice.



The research behind the madness:

Don’t take just my word for it… there have been countless studies and research backs me up on the reasons that I have provided you. Studies show that when you dress up your psyche will react in a more positive manner than it does when you “bum it out.” The research also showed that students who dress up for exams are more likely to score higher than those who do not. When you feel good, you do good. Have you ever heard of the saying, “Dress for Success”?  Well, that applies here folks!


Another applicable expression, “Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.” There is some magical chemical being emitted in your brain biologically when you step into that power suit or certain outfit that you just totally vibe with. You feel that power and confidence start rapidly coursing through your veins and it puts you in total control of your attitude, enhances your performance, and in some cases it even stimulates creativity. An example of a popular study is the lab coat vs. doctor coat experiment. You may have heard of it, so I won’t bore you with the details but when boiled down, participants made far less errors while wearing the doctor’s coat in comparison to the lab coat simply because they felt that it being a doctor’s coat meant that it made them just as smart as a doctor. I am not making this up y’all! With all of this being said, you can still totally rock the leggings and oversized cozy tee-shirts on those days that you just can’t anymore and need to put your comfort above all else.



Just try it! Set your alarms for just 20 minutes earlier, get up, and find that outfit that makes your heart soar with excitement and gives you that boost of confidence that’ll get you that A+. (I will only accept partial credit for letting you in on the secret to success.) No harm no foul, am I right?

Oh and don’t forget to tag us in a photo of you in your power suit and share all of your success stories!

 

Research source via http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022103112000200

Words by Bailey Womack

Edits by Reilly Farris and Maia Wilson

Creative Direction by Michaela Bull

Imagery by Criselda Ocon

Modeled by Taylar Gomez

Shoot Coordinated by Carolina Gonzalez

Find And Seek

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We’re back in full force producing our final two issues of the semester and as I sit down to write this letter to our loyal readers I’ve realized that I’ve had time to reflect on a few occurrences that have happened to me and others who surround. It seems we have strayed from what we know and discovered a new or altered way of being.

It’s been a running joke amongst a few members of the NuView team that we are still learning how to have fun and be “normal” college students (i.e. sleeping in, going out, and focusing less on school and more on social lives). But our field of interest has so strongly enforced us to constantly be hungry for more and gain as much professional experience as we can while we’re young. Instead we have tried to challenge ourselves to balance both. During the semester thus far, we have found that one can still gain valuable experiences when doing activities that seem inefficient. See, sometimes people need a break from the constant structure to find greater creativity and drive. Just as we have come to understand this contrasting fact, others have redefined preconceived ideas in their careers, interests and everyday lives.

This month of March, NuView has comprised a collection of individuals in which we have conversated with and hope to have captured the essence of true juxtaposition. The idea of joining two unlike figures or thoughts into a concept has been reflected through Bailey Womack’s article on how levels of dress improving performance, our editors article of wearing thrift store clothes without looking thrifted, and an essay of the male perception of female dress. With the addition of a few new members to our energized and eager team, NuView magazine is ready to make an impact on you, our perspective readers.  
Another aspect of the magazine that we would like to introduce is our strides to create a more social community. The historic idea that “fashion people” are exclusive and uninviting is what we seek to avoid. Through our social media outlets (Twitter and Instagram) our goal is to showcase not only our internal talent, but also our viewers and their independent successes (#nuviewmag to be featured). Not only to bring people together virtually, but with our upcoming launch event we aim to create a physical place for the inspired and the inspiring to connect and potentially collaborate in the future. By enforcing all of these new and improved efforts to ultimately establish a lasting brand, I am confident in the skills each member of NuView has brought and will bring to this issue and the ones coming soon. Enjoy.

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Photography by Michaela Bull

Styling by Maia Wilson

Modeling by Valerie Shea

Follow Valerie Shea on Instagram @valerieshea

Clothes from Circa 77 Vintage

Visit Circa 77 Vintage in-store and follow on instagram @circa7vintage