What the Other Person Thinks

An Insight on Gender Perception

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There is a well-known saying, women don’t dress for men because if they did they would be naked; women dress for other women, referred to by designer, Betsey Johnson. This is a controversial truth, but there is questioning about who people dress for and more importantly how others perceive it. Often, individuals, who have passion for their freedom to exercise their personal style are outcasted by this stray of normality. On the inside they may have that “I-don’t-care-what-people think” mindset, they wear what they want because it makes them happy, but what about the ones who aren’t as confident and maybe care more about what people think of their exterior armour. What do people think about both of these separate dressers? Do people really notice? We wanted cold, hard opinions and what better than from the gracious, but honest guys on our college campus. We would explore the inner thoughts of others by asking what they really think of the outfits that make individuals feel happiest in, but are unique to their counterparts.

I spoke with Marcel Smith, Colton Johnson, Derek Boone, Nate Proffitt, and John Davis-Lopez to answer some of these burning thoughts, and to my surprise their answers were often unanimous, giving us consistent insight into the brains of ones we may not have ever gotten the answers to. I started with the simple question of what do they notice in a person they find attractive from afar.

The first observation was noticeable effort, John stated “I find it attractive when you can tell that effort is put into their appearance” and Nate complemented “and they’re not timid to express their personality in their appearance.” Then posture, “what many people overlook I feel, is posture. People look happier, more friendly and overall more attractive with good posture” Colton commented.

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What is your instinct thought when a someone is wearing a bold piece of clothing?

Nate started with “I think in general I have a lot of respect for people who think outside of the box with their outfits because they don’t necessarily follow a pattern for what is typical or popular.” Similarly, Colton followed with “It takes courage to wear something that will stand out in a crowd. You are wanting to draw attention to your outfit and therefore yourself which is hard for many people these days to do (not behind a screen).” John contradicted though, he explained  I will find it more intimidating to talk to [a girl]. I’m already not bold in general, so by her wearing something bold (well, it’s more in how they carry themselves) I’m going to think that I have no chance.  Marcel also affirmed it’s in “the way she wears her clothes that say a lot about her.”

In general, what draws you to a person?

“Their personality, how open they are to meeting new people, if I can be myself around them without being judged,” noted Derek. Colton seconded, “ to have a personality to back up your outfit is important.” Nate expanded by saying “confidence and people who are positive because it is clear that they are comfortable in their own skin and have a healthy outlook on life.”

Do you think there is a stigma on people who wear outfits that are seen as crazy or unconventional? Why do you think that is?

They all agreed that “a stigma is there, and people are judged for being different.” John added, “People like things the way they are. Seeing something bold will affect what they see as normal.” “There is even a greater problem in male fashion, Colton stated, “where ‘dressing up’ has fundamentally meant the same thing for a 100 years. I was talking to my girlfriend about how depressing it is that we spend countless hours looking for a wedding dress, but when the big day comes [the male is] expected to throw on essentially the same black tux that [his] father did and his father’s father did. “ Nate also commented that “it has gotten a little better, but it used to be that men who took time in their appearance, in clothing and/or hair were labeled gay. “I still see this many cases,” Colton replied.

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It is often perceived that when someone wears an outfit that is viewed as flashy and “out there” in their everyday lives, they really putting on a costume, trying to be a specific character. Do you feel this is true with females?

Colton explained that he doesn’t “believe that putting on a flashy outfit means that they are putting on a character. If anything changes, it is their confidence level which can influence their personality, though that does not change them as a person.” Correspondingly, Derek stated “they might just be a more confident version of themselves.” Nate profoundly commented “I don’t think wearing something different means that you are trying to be someone different it’s just expression in a way that others may have not seen before.”

What do you admire and notice most when approaching a girl? And would you say this is similar in what you see in your guy friends?

Remarkably, most of them mentioned shoes. “Specifically, I pay attention to shoes. Shoes are a big thing for guys” Nate initiated. Colton then stated, they are “the hardest part of the outfit to get right. Picking the right shoe is an art.” Marcel added “I look at that their smile and their shoes.” Then it was about being comfortable in their own skin, John stated, “I admire when someone I  approach can be completely themselves. I admire when they’re not afraid of what other people think,” “This applies for both my male and female friends,” Derek concluded.

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Lastly, do you believe females dress for men, themselves, or other women? Or is it a combination?

“I think that if you ask any girl this question most likely the answer will be for herself.  I believe that is true to some extent, but behind the scenes there is more to the story,” Colton noted. And elaborated, “Our perception of beauty comes from others, so while you are looking cute for yourself, your concept of “cute” came from someone else. In some ways, you are dressing for other women. Now we can go even deeper and figure out what these women were thinking when they made these opinions. Was the look for sex appeal? Nine times out of ten this is the point of fashion. It’s why sells fashion. You could then make the argument that most women dress for men.” For Derek, he feels “different people dress for different reasons. Some people dress for themselves, less confident people might dress to impress others, and those who want a boyfriend might dress to impress a guy they’re talking to.” Marcel related, “I think that it depends on the situation, but for the most part they dress for themselves first and others second.” John summed it up by saying it’s “a combination of the three.”

From asking all of these questions, what struck me was the commonality between their answers. It wasn’t that one had an extreme view from the next, but that they all were aware and impacted by the same features and beliefs, aside from their various backgrounds. Clothes are quite frankly our exterior code of armour, for more reasons than physical safety, but they also can be an instant glimpse of an individual’s personality. What a person wears can define who they are, especially when they do it with confidence and are truly happy in their sartorial selections, and based on the guys’ answers, people notice.

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Special thanks to the five guys who were interviewed. Follow Colton on Instagram @superlativesound, Marcel @marsmith7, Derek @derekthabombb, Nate @nateproffitt63, and John @blackjuan94.

Words by Maia Wilson

Edit by Carolina Gonzalez

Photographs by Blaise Butera

Follow models, Schuyler Hardy @skycornelius and Ximena Arista @xvmena

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This is NOT a Thrifted Haul

Styling your Thrifted Treasures

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As college students, we are all trying to spend less money on clothes we buy because let’s face it, we are a cliche of “broke college kids.” The problem though is not looking like we shopped in the discounted section at GoodWill. The editors at NuView accepted the challenge of looking much more elevated than our wallets allow by styling our thrifted finds to create unique looks that can easily be mimicked. Scroll below to discover new ways to style outfits without looking cheap!

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Follow our models, Megan McHugh and Gianna Schneider on Instagram  @meganashleymchugh and @lightofgigi

Styled by Rose Kuo, Taylar Gomez, Maia Wilson, Michaela Bull, Carolina Gonzalez, and Reilly Farris

Photographed by Michaela Bull

Words by Maia Wilson

Shoot Coordinated by Carolina Gonzalez

Diving into Show Production

 

Two sophomores get a jumpstart into their careers

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When is it too early to start looking into internships? The answer is NEVER. Katlan Henderson and Chanell Portis are sophomores in the Merchandising program at UNT and have begun their interning experience NOW by working for Rhonda Sargent Chambers Show Productions as paid interns. They have both gained an abundance of skills from working with RSC that they plan to use in their future fashion careers.

A common question I’ve found that many students have about internships, is where you look to find the internships themselves. How did you find out about interning for RSC? What was the process like?

Katlan: It wasn’t really a traditional process of getting an internship. In this case I didn’t have to seek out this internship. I had volunteered for RSC numerous times and built a professional relationship with Rhonda and her team. One day I woke up and checked my email and she had offered me a spring internship with her! In this case the previous work and time I had put in with her benefitted me most. I worked her events as a volunteer for about a year before I was offered the position as an intern.

Chanell: I started as a volunteer for Rhonda, I heard about my first opportunity after getting an email because I was a member of Merchandising Inc. After working multiple shows and staying in contact with her, she offered me a position on her team. I worked hard as a volunteer and she was able to see how hard and diligently I worked.

 

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What are common tasks you do when assisting RSC?

K: My responsibilities vary depending on the event. Rhonda has allowed me to work front of house and back of house so tasks often differ. Common responsibilities with every event are usually pre-dressing and fitting models, organizing their rack, checking models in, dressing models during actual show time, taping shoes, tagging clothing, steaming clothing, etc.

C: I usually show up hours ahead of the show to help prep-garment racks, organize clothing, accessories, and shoes. My tasks can change depending on the event and the volunteers that Rhonda has working that day. Since I have worked with her team many times before, I am given more responsibility to do more difficult tasks. I have personally assisted her and worked front-of-house managing guests, organized models, and a commonly help dress and change models during the show.

 

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Can you describe a memorable moment or experience that you’ve had while working with RSC?

K: My favorite memory working with RSC is when I worked the Versace Show. Versace as a brand has always been a favorite of mine and I’m a huge Donatella fan. Being up close, touching and seeing all of the details in her designs before the show was amazing. That show was also the first time I really got to be laid back and talk personally with Rhonda. It was the first show that she gave me the chance to prove myself at the front of house and back of house. Afterwards, she stuck around and chatted with Chanell and I. We took selfies and she video-taped us pretending to go down the Versace runway after the show was over; it was great!

C: I have had many incredible and memorable experiences when working with RSC productions. Around May of last year I had worked the DIFFA (Design Industries Foundation Fighting Against Aids) fashion show. The theme was cirque, so there were grandiose costumes, painted dancers, animals, drag queens, clowns, and so much more. I was also able to meet and create relationships with a few models that I still talk to today.

Another memorable moment was when I was invited to work the Dallas Versace show. It was wonderful to see the beautiful clothes I had seen on the Fashion Week runway and be a part of something so special! All in all, I have been able to create and strengthen friendships and connections, which is something so incredibly special to me.

How do you think this job will benefit you once you graduate and enter the workforce?

K: The main skill I’ve gained from working with RSC is how to have incredible attention to detail and work swiftly at the same time. The pace of fashion shows is incredibly fast and you have to be able to keep up. There’s a strategy to everything that’s done backstage and I think the best skill that working with her gives you is the ability to think on your feet. Sometimes, things go wrong and you have a split second to figure out how to fix it so that the people watching on the other side of the wall don’t know anything is wrong. The ability to work with people efficiently is something Rhonda and her team do very well and subconsciously teach the rest of us.

C: Working in the production side of fashion shows is nothing like many would believe it to be. It is an enormous amount of work. I was able to learn to communicate with various personalities, plan and organize apparel, keep track of inventory, manage guests and models, and style looks. I believe that with these skills, a future employer will see my ability to learn quickly, my diligence with performing tasks, and my knowledge to further help my career.

 

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Would you recommend doing an internship (assuming it wasn’t a requirement to graduate) to a student wanting to enter the fashion industry?

K: Yes, I definitely would. I feel that it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into before you decide that you want to do this particular job as a career. I’ve always wanted a career, not a job, so I want to be certain that I enjoy what I do. Doing numerous internships helps you figure out exactly what niche I fit into, what doesn’t work for me and what does. My advice to anyone wondering if they should do more than their required internship is to definitely try everything you can make time for.

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C: Yes! I would highly recommend that students pursuing any career in fashion, should do an internship. An internship allows you to gain invaluable experience, make connections and fully develop the skills and knowledge within a certain field. School can only teach you so much, it is the hands-on experience that will truly push you further. Anyone can go to school, but it takes a person with passion and drive to make their dream a reality.

The skills that Katlan and Chanell have learned while interning for RSC will be incredibly beneficial in the future when it comes time for them to enter the workforce. By taking the initiative to take part in such a fast-paced position, they’re setting themselves apart from other applicants in their field of interest. While your classes give important knowledge on different aspects of the interest, the experience you gain will benefit you the most, as it has for them.

 

Follow Katlan Henderson and Chanell Portis on Instagram @kae.mechele and @chanellportis

Words by Raeleigh Hall

Edit by Reilly Farris and Maia Wilson

Images from Katlan Henderson and Chanell Portis