Diving into Show Production

 

Two sophomores get a jumpstart into their careers

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When is it too early to start looking into internships? The answer is NEVER. Katlan Henderson and Chanell Portis are sophomores in the Merchandising program at UNT and have begun their interning experience NOW by working for Rhonda Sargent Chambers Show Productions as paid interns. They have both gained an abundance of skills from working with RSC that they plan to use in their future fashion careers.

A common question I’ve found that many students have about internships, is where you look to find the internships themselves. How did you find out about interning for RSC? What was the process like?

Katlan: It wasn’t really a traditional process of getting an internship. In this case I didn’t have to seek out this internship. I had volunteered for RSC numerous times and built a professional relationship with Rhonda and her team. One day I woke up and checked my email and she had offered me a spring internship with her! In this case the previous work and time I had put in with her benefitted me most. I worked her events as a volunteer for about a year before I was offered the position as an intern.

Chanell: I started as a volunteer for Rhonda, I heard about my first opportunity after getting an email because I was a member of Merchandising Inc. After working multiple shows and staying in contact with her, she offered me a position on her team. I worked hard as a volunteer and she was able to see how hard and diligently I worked.

 

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What are common tasks you do when assisting RSC?

K: My responsibilities vary depending on the event. Rhonda has allowed me to work front of house and back of house so tasks often differ. Common responsibilities with every event are usually pre-dressing and fitting models, organizing their rack, checking models in, dressing models during actual show time, taping shoes, tagging clothing, steaming clothing, etc.

C: I usually show up hours ahead of the show to help prep-garment racks, organize clothing, accessories, and shoes. My tasks can change depending on the event and the volunteers that Rhonda has working that day. Since I have worked with her team many times before, I am given more responsibility to do more difficult tasks. I have personally assisted her and worked front-of-house managing guests, organized models, and a commonly help dress and change models during the show.

 

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Can you describe a memorable moment or experience that you’ve had while working with RSC?

K: My favorite memory working with RSC is when I worked the Versace Show. Versace as a brand has always been a favorite of mine and I’m a huge Donatella fan. Being up close, touching and seeing all of the details in her designs before the show was amazing. That show was also the first time I really got to be laid back and talk personally with Rhonda. It was the first show that she gave me the chance to prove myself at the front of house and back of house. Afterwards, she stuck around and chatted with Chanell and I. We took selfies and she video-taped us pretending to go down the Versace runway after the show was over; it was great!

C: I have had many incredible and memorable experiences when working with RSC productions. Around May of last year I had worked the DIFFA (Design Industries Foundation Fighting Against Aids) fashion show. The theme was cirque, so there were grandiose costumes, painted dancers, animals, drag queens, clowns, and so much more. I was also able to meet and create relationships with a few models that I still talk to today.

Another memorable moment was when I was invited to work the Dallas Versace show. It was wonderful to see the beautiful clothes I had seen on the Fashion Week runway and be a part of something so special! All in all, I have been able to create and strengthen friendships and connections, which is something so incredibly special to me.

How do you think this job will benefit you once you graduate and enter the workforce?

K: The main skill I’ve gained from working with RSC is how to have incredible attention to detail and work swiftly at the same time. The pace of fashion shows is incredibly fast and you have to be able to keep up. There’s a strategy to everything that’s done backstage and I think the best skill that working with her gives you is the ability to think on your feet. Sometimes, things go wrong and you have a split second to figure out how to fix it so that the people watching on the other side of the wall don’t know anything is wrong. The ability to work with people efficiently is something Rhonda and her team do very well and subconsciously teach the rest of us.

C: Working in the production side of fashion shows is nothing like many would believe it to be. It is an enormous amount of work. I was able to learn to communicate with various personalities, plan and organize apparel, keep track of inventory, manage guests and models, and style looks. I believe that with these skills, a future employer will see my ability to learn quickly, my diligence with performing tasks, and my knowledge to further help my career.

 

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Would you recommend doing an internship (assuming it wasn’t a requirement to graduate) to a student wanting to enter the fashion industry?

K: Yes, I definitely would. I feel that it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into before you decide that you want to do this particular job as a career. I’ve always wanted a career, not a job, so I want to be certain that I enjoy what I do. Doing numerous internships helps you figure out exactly what niche I fit into, what doesn’t work for me and what does. My advice to anyone wondering if they should do more than their required internship is to definitely try everything you can make time for.

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C: Yes! I would highly recommend that students pursuing any career in fashion, should do an internship. An internship allows you to gain invaluable experience, make connections and fully develop the skills and knowledge within a certain field. School can only teach you so much, it is the hands-on experience that will truly push you further. Anyone can go to school, but it takes a person with passion and drive to make their dream a reality.

The skills that Katlan and Chanell have learned while interning for RSC will be incredibly beneficial in the future when it comes time for them to enter the workforce. By taking the initiative to take part in such a fast-paced position, they’re setting themselves apart from other applicants in their field of interest. While your classes give important knowledge on different aspects of the interest, the experience you gain will benefit you the most, as it has for them.

 

Follow Katlan Henderson and Chanell Portis on Instagram @kae.mechele and @chanellportis

Words by Raeleigh Hall

Edit by Reilly Farris and Maia Wilson

Images from Katlan Henderson and Chanell Portis

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Why I Dress Up for Class

A personal essay and the facts behind wearing what fits your personality

Upon reading the title of this article I know I am receiving a massive eyeroll from just about every college student out there… but hear me out you guys, I swear, I do have a point.



I will admit, most days I wake up thinking I should just walk out my front door in my pajamas without even glancing in the mirror; but I know that if I do this, I will never truly “leave my bed.” I will just be stuck in this grumpy and tired mentality all day and won’t accomplish as much as I’d like. So here are a few reasons as to why I get ready for class each morning:

1. You just feel more confident. Personally, I have never been one to have my life completely together and running smoothly, so at least by getting ready for school I can fool people into thinking that I do. It’s a given that most college students are struggling to some degree (pun intended) to make ends meet, but that doesn’t mean that we want the whole world to be able to notice “the struggle” when they glance our way.

2. When you find a job and have to wear full-on business attire and be ready at 7 A.M. every morning it won’t seem so bad, because you will already be accustomed to getting up early and looking put-together. It is also a great time to see what types of  looks you like and how you can make them your own before you officially enter the workforce.



3. You always want to dress to impress or to attract the kind of people you want in your life. Even if you don’t want to fess up, most humans formulate impressions about others’ characters seconds after meeting them. It’s just the way humans are wired. The way you dress and present yourself really communicates who you are as a person, so you always want to leave them thinking highly of you!

4. Lastly, when you’re in a fashion-related major, the pressure is ON. Not always from just other classmates within the major itself, either. When I am meeting someone for the first time (on or off campus) and I tell them what my major is, they will literally glance me over and make a snap judgement as to whether or not I know what I am doing by how I am dressed. So, it seems I have to always be on top of my game and ready to prove myself at a moment’s notice.



The research behind the madness:

Don’t take just my word for it… there have been countless studies and research backs me up on the reasons that I have provided you. Studies show that when you dress up your psyche will react in a more positive manner than it does when you “bum it out.” The research also showed that students who dress up for exams are more likely to score higher than those who do not. When you feel good, you do good. Have you ever heard of the saying, “Dress for Success”?  Well, that applies here folks!


Another applicable expression, “Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.” There is some magical chemical being emitted in your brain biologically when you step into that power suit or certain outfit that you just totally vibe with. You feel that power and confidence start rapidly coursing through your veins and it puts you in total control of your attitude, enhances your performance, and in some cases it even stimulates creativity. An example of a popular study is the lab coat vs. doctor coat experiment. You may have heard of it, so I won’t bore you with the details but when boiled down, participants made far less errors while wearing the doctor’s coat in comparison to the lab coat simply because they felt that it being a doctor’s coat meant that it made them just as smart as a doctor. I am not making this up y’all! With all of this being said, you can still totally rock the leggings and oversized cozy tee-shirts on those days that you just can’t anymore and need to put your comfort above all else.



Just try it! Set your alarms for just 20 minutes earlier, get up, and find that outfit that makes your heart soar with excitement and gives you that boost of confidence that’ll get you that A+. (I will only accept partial credit for letting you in on the secret to success.) No harm no foul, am I right?

Oh and don’t forget to tag us in a photo of you in your power suit and share all of your success stories!

 

Research source via http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022103112000200

Words by Bailey Womack

Edits by Reilly Farris and Maia Wilson

Creative Direction by Michaela Bull

Imagery by Criselda Ocon

Modeled by Taylar Gomez

Shoot Coordinated by Carolina Gonzalez

Find And Seek

MARCHmarch-editors6

We’re back in full force producing our final two issues of the semester and as I sit down to write this letter to our loyal readers I’ve realized that I’ve had time to reflect on a few occurrences that have happened to me and others who surround. It seems we have strayed from what we know and discovered a new or altered way of being.

It’s been a running joke amongst a few members of the NuView team that we are still learning how to have fun and be “normal” college students (i.e. sleeping in, going out, and focusing less on school and more on social lives). But our field of interest has so strongly enforced us to constantly be hungry for more and gain as much professional experience as we can while we’re young. Instead we have tried to challenge ourselves to balance both. During the semester thus far, we have found that one can still gain valuable experiences when doing activities that seem inefficient. See, sometimes people need a break from the constant structure to find greater creativity and drive. Just as we have come to understand this contrasting fact, others have redefined preconceived ideas in their careers, interests and everyday lives.

This month of March, NuView has comprised a collection of individuals in which we have conversated with and hope to have captured the essence of true juxtaposition. The idea of joining two unlike figures or thoughts into a concept has been reflected through Bailey Womack’s article on how levels of dress improving performance, our editors article of wearing thrift store clothes without looking thrifted, and an essay of the male perception of female dress. With the addition of a few new members to our energized and eager team, NuView magazine is ready to make an impact on you, our perspective readers.  
Another aspect of the magazine that we would like to introduce is our strides to create a more social community. The historic idea that “fashion people” are exclusive and uninviting is what we seek to avoid. Through our social media outlets (Twitter and Instagram) our goal is to showcase not only our internal talent, but also our viewers and their independent successes (#nuviewmag to be featured). Not only to bring people together virtually, but with our upcoming launch event we aim to create a physical place for the inspired and the inspiring to connect and potentially collaborate in the future. By enforcing all of these new and improved efforts to ultimately establish a lasting brand, I am confident in the skills each member of NuView has brought and will bring to this issue and the ones coming soon. Enjoy.

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Photography by Michaela Bull

Styling by Maia Wilson

Modeling by Valerie Shea

Follow Valerie Shea on Instagram @valerieshea

Clothes from Circa 77 Vintage

Visit Circa 77 Vintage in-store and follow on instagram @circa7vintage